Viewing cable 02ABUJA1849
Title: NIGERIA RESPONDS TO MADAGASCAR DEMARCHE

IdentifierCreatedReleasedClassificationOrigin
02ABUJA18492002-06-21 15:33:00 2011-08-30 01:44:00 CONFIDENTIAL Embassy Abuja
This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.
C O N F I D E N T I A L ABUJA 001849 
 
SIPDIS 
 
 
E.O. 12958: DECL: 06/20/2012 
TAGS: PREL PGOV MA NI LI OAU
SUBJECT: NIGERIA RESPONDS TO MADAGASCAR DEMARCHE 
 
REF: A. STATE 119427 
     ¶B. ADDIS ABABA 2193 
 
 
CLASSIFIED BY CDA ANDREWS.  REASON:  1.5(B) 
 
 
¶1.  (C) Summary:  Nigeria dislikes the way Ravalomanana came 
to power but likely will not oppose acceptance of his rule. 
Nigeria is not a member of the OAU Central Organ.  End 
Summary. 
 
 
¶2.  (C) Because all GON officials (Presidency and MFA) able 
to discuss Madagascar were unavailable June 20, CDA could not 
make ref A demarche until June 21.  MFA Under Secretary for 
Africa Femi George took essentially the same position as 
Ethiopian State Minister for Foreign Affairs Tekeda (ref B). 
Clearly unhappy with Ravalomanana, George said, inter alia: 
 
 
-- Ravalomanana had "committed an illegality in the face of 
the OAU." 
-- The "OAU Convention cannot be set aside just because we 
like someone." 
-- "He should not have taken power by force; he should have 
exhausted the Constitutional process." 
 
 
¶3.  (C) George went on to assert that the OAU was trying to 
examine how to contend with the fact that Ravalomanana now 
controlled 80% of Madagascar.  Taking on board our point 
about Ratsiraka's departure, George opined that, as a result 
of this action, "we would probably see some movement" in 
Addis.  While Nigeria was not a member of the OAU Central 
Organ and not directly involved in the discussions, it was 
possible that consultations were taking place at the Head of 
State level. 
 
 
¶4.  (C) Comment: George also alluded to fighting in Liberia, 
worrying that whatever decision the OAU took might set a 
precedent that would affect Liberia, much closer to home and 
more central to Nigeria's foreign policy than Madagascar. 
Given Nigeria's importance on the continent, it is unlikely 
that Nigeria is not being consulted.  Despite his lengthy 
expression of annoyance at Ravalomanana's rise to power by 
means other than a clearly Constitutional transfer of power, 
George indicated that Nigeria would not block an eventual 
acceptance of his government. 
ANDREWS