Viewing cable 03THEHAGUE1857
Title: DUTCH: SUMMARY OF EU THOUGHTS ON HUMAN RIGHTS

IdentifierCreatedReleasedClassificationOrigin
03THEHAGUE18572003-07-22 15:19:00 2011-08-30 01:44:00 CONFIDENTIAL Embassy The Hague
This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.
C O N F I D E N T I A L THE HAGUE 001857 
 
SIPDIS 
 
E.O. 12958: DECL: 07/22/2008 
TAGS: PHUM PREL IR BM CG ZI KN NL UNGA UNHRC UN
SUBJECT: DUTCH:  SUMMARY OF EU THOUGHTS ON HUMAN RIGHTS 
 
REF: A. SECSTATE 197183 
 
     ¶B. SECSTATE 206381 
     ¶C. 7/18 CARTER PERRY-WITMER-HUNT EMAILS (NOTAL) 
 
Classified By: PolCouns Mary E. Daly Reasons 1.5 (b) and (d) 
 
¶1. (C) Following delivery of HR reftels on July 21, MFA 
Senior Policy Advisor for Human Rights, Hans Docter (protect 
source), confirmed that the EU will introduce UNGA 
resolutions on Burma and the DRC; a decision on Iran has been 
postponed until early September, but appears likely.  Docter 
also shared EU concerns on Guantanamo, U.S.-EU relations on 
HR issues, and EU thinking on the reform of UN human rights 
system.  He also recommended holding high-level U.S.-EU 
consultations on human rights. 
 
 
UNGA - Iran, Burma, DRC, Zimbabwe, North Korea 
--------------------------------------------- --- 
 
¶2. (C) The EU recently agreed internally to wait until early 
September to make a final decision on an Iran resolution. 
The Dutch strongly favor a resolution, and Docter commented 
that there is much greater support for one this year than 
last year.  Barring any major improvement in the human rights 
situation between now and September, Docter is "fairly 
confident" that the EU will introduce a resolution on Iran. 
The EU will introduce resolutions on Burma and the DRC.  The 
Dutch would also like to see an EU-sponsored resolution on 
Zimbabwe, but internal disagreements, especially by the 
French, remain.  (Note:  The Dutch appear willing, if the 
U.S. agrees, to work with the U.S. in encouraging specific 
African countries to introduce a Zimbabwe resolution.  End 
note.)   Docter brought up the subject of North Korea, noting 
that the EU is waiting and watching to see what the US and 
Japan will do. 
 
Guantanamo 
------------ 
 
¶3. (C) Docter broached the situation in Guantanamo, stating 
that the EU remains concerned over the lack of information 
about the status of the prisoners.  (Note:  The MFA 
highlights this topic in every discussion involving human 
rights.  The issue remains popular in the Dutch press and 
with members of Parliament. End Note.)  While the Dutch are 
not calling into question the treatment of the prisoners, the 
GoNL shares EU concerns about prisoner access to due process, 
the possibility of closed trials, and the death penalty. 
Docter opined that if the U.S. agreed to exclude the 
possibility of a death penalty sentence, EU interest and 
concerns would greatly decrease. 
 
 
EU:  U.S. Needs To Do More 
---------------------------- 
 
¶4. (C) In an informal meeting of EU human rights advisors on 
July 19 in Venice, Docter stated there was obvious resentment 
of the U.S.  Many EU member states are of the opinion that 
the U.S. pressures Europe into taking on "the major HR 
issues," but later "takes all the credit" for hard-fought EU 
successes.  At the same time, the U.S. does not adequately 
support issues of importance to the EU.  The Dutch disagree 
with this assessment.  Nevertheless, Docter commented that if 
the U.S. were more supportive of the EU on, for example, 
Turkmenistan and Chechnya, such EU resentment would likely 
diminish.  Docter also suggested the U.S. approach the EU 
Presidency to propose high-level U.S.-EU human rights talks. 
U.S. officials might then also visit influential EU capitals, 
as occurred in preparation for last year's UNCHR. 
 
Reform of UN Human Rights System 
-------------------------------------- 
 
¶5.  (C) Docter said the EU is looking at ways in which to 
reform how the UN approaches human rights.  No decisions have 
been made to date.  However, discussion includes doing away 
with the UNCHR, leaving the third committee in charge of 
dealing with HR issues.  The EU is also internally assessing 
how the UN could increase cooperation and the operational 
effectiveness of UN agencies already dealing with aspects of 
human rights. (Note:  The Dutch will serve on the next UNCHR. 
 End Note.) 
RUSSEL