Viewing cable 05MUSCAT1289
Title: CHILD LABOR UPDATE FOR OMAN

IdentifierCreatedReleasedClassificationOrigin
05MUSCAT12892005-08-21 13:18:00 2011-08-30 01:44:00 UNCLASSIFIED Embassy Muscat
This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.
UNCLAS MUSCAT 001289 
 
SIPDIS 
 
STATE FOR DRL/IL (LHOLT), NEA/RA, NEA/ARPI 
STATE PASS USTR FOR JBUNTIN, AROSENBERG 
DOL/ILAB FOR TINA MCCARTER 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: ELAB EIND ETRD PHUM SOCI MU
SUBJECT: CHILD LABOR UPDATE FOR OMAN 
 
REF: A. SECSTATE 143552 
 
     ¶B. 04 MUSCAT 1449 
     ¶C. MUSCAT 1237 
     ¶D. MUSCAT 1045 
     ¶E. MUSCAT 1277 
 
Per ref A, the following is updated information to supplement 
our 2004 and previous child labor reports.  Updates are keyed 
to categories listed in ref A, para 7: 
 
A) Laws/Regulations proscribing the worst forms of child 
labor: 
 
-- While the Omani government does not consider minor camel 
jockeys as necessarily falling under the province of 
International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention 182, in 
August 2005 the Ministry of Sport raised the minimum legal 
age of camel jockeys to 18.  A waiver is available that sets 
the current minimum age at 14 years, rising annually by one 
year until achieving the 18-year minimum by the 2009 camel 
racing season (ref C). 
 
-- On July 3, the Sultanate ratified ILO Conventions 105 and 
138, Abolition of Forced Labor and the Minimum Age of 
Employment (ref D). 
 
-- The inter-ministerial Committee on Health and Safety, 
established after Oman's 2002 ratification of ILO Convention 
182, is still drafting a proposed list of the worst forms of 
child labor, as called for in Article 4 of the Convention. 
 
B) Implementation and Enforcement: 
 
-- The Ministry of Manpower is charged with enforcement of 
Omani labor laws. 
 
-- Statistics for 2004 indicate a staff of 42 persons in the 
directorate charged with reviewing labor disputes.  The 
directorate conducted 4148 labor inspections in 2004 and 257 
re-inspections.  The statistics do not specify whether 
children were among workers at any of the inspected 
establishments (15 is the minimum age for non-hazardous 
employment), but the total workforce of inspected 
establishments totaled 82,964. 
 
C) Social programs to prevent worst forms of child labor: 
 
-- As reported in 2004 (ref B), basic education is compulsory 
through grade 10. 
 
-- The National Committee on the Rights of the Child, the 
Ministries of Social Development, Education and Manpower, and 
the local UNICEF office are all engaged in efforts to ensure 
basic education and a healthy environment for minors. 
 
D) Comprehensive government policy: 
 
-- Among the government's efforts to protect children is the 
2004-2006 Country Program of Cooperation between the 
Sultanate of Oman and UNICEF.  Representatives from both 
parties conducted a mid-term review of the program in May 
¶2005.  The joint strategy focuses on improving well-being of 
children and families, promoting quality education, child 
protection, and development of life-skills and healthy 
lifestyles among adolescents. 
 
E) Continual progress toward eliminating the worst forms of 
child labor: 
 
-- UNICEF and the ILO have applauded the Sultanate's decision 
to raise the minimum age of camel jockeys (ref E). 
BALTIMORE