Viewing cable 05MUSCAT616
Title: UNICEF ASSISTS UAE ON CAMEL RACING ISSUE

IdentifierCreatedReleasedClassificationOrigin
05MUSCAT6162005-04-13 10:07:00 2011-08-30 01:44:00 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy Muscat
This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.
UNCLAS MUSCAT 000616 
 
SIPDIS 
 
SENSITIVE 
 
DEPT FOR NEA/ARPI, DRL (JDMARIA), G/TIP (FASSEFA) 
STATE PASS TO USTR (A. ROSENBERG) 
USDOL FOR B. CLATANOFF 
US MISSION GENEVA FOR NANCE KYLOH 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: PHUM SOCI PREL ELAB MU
SUBJECT: UNICEF ASSISTS UAE ON CAMEL RACING ISSUE 
 
REF: A. MUSCAT 607 
 
     ¶B. ABU DHABI 1604 
 
¶1. (SBU) The United Nations International Children's Fund 
(UNICEF) regional office in Muscat has recently been working 
with the United Arab Emirates in developing comprehensive new 
legislation that will cover the monitoring and implementation 
of the announced ban on the use of child camel jockeys in the 
UAE.  UNICEF representative June Kunugi (protect throughout) 
told PolOff that it appears that the UAE is aggressively 
working towards eliminating child camel jockeys, with the new 
legislation set to be presented to the Emirati legislature 
and Supreme Council of Rulers by mid-April.  (Note: While the 
law is still being reviewed by the federal Cabinet, new 
procedures went into effect on March 31.  The procedures 
include a requirement that children of expatriates have their 
own passports.  In addition, camel jockey sponsors have been 
given two months to complete the paperwork necessary for 
repatriating the children for whom they are responsible.  End 
note.)  Furthermore, in an effort to facilitate repatriation, 
the UAE is reportedly funding repatriation centers in 
Pakistan, Bangladesh, and elsewhere to receive the children 
rescued in the UAE.  Reportedly upset with the lack of proper 
supervision at the centers, UAE officials requested the aid 
of UNICEF offices in the respective source countries to 
assist in improving oversight. 
 
¶2. (SBU) When addressing the specifics of the new Emirati 
regulations, particularly with reference to the UAE-Omani 
border town of Al-Buraimi, Kunugi said that the new law will 
ban all camel owners from using children inside or outside 
the UAE, including any from Oman.  If the UAE law tracks with 
the one in Saudi Arabia, penalties for violations by camel 
owners will range anywhere from their permanent ban from the 
sport, to steep fines and possible prison sentences. 
According to Kunugi, regardless of the exact legislation, 
having an official body of law upon which to build marks a 
important step in the elimination of child camel jockeys. 
STEWART