Viewing cable 06SANSALVADOR1085
Title: SALVADORAN APPOINTED WORLD BANK MANAGING DIRECTOR

IdentifierCreatedReleasedClassificationOrigin
06SANSALVADOR10852006-04-25 21:23:00 2011-08-30 01:44:00 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy San Salvador
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RR RUEHWEB

DE RUEHSN #1085 1152123
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 252123Z APR 06
FM AMEMBASSY SAN SALVADOR
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 2111
INFO RUEHZA/WHA CENTRAL AMERICAN COLLECTIVE
RUCPDOC/USDOC WASHDC
RUEATRS/DEPT OF TREASURY WASH DC
UNCLAS SAN SALVADOR 001085 
 
SIPDIS 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
STATE PASS USAID 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: IBRD PINR ECON EAID EFIN ES
SUBJECT: SALVADORAN APPOINTED WORLD BANK MANAGING DIRECTOR 
 
 
Summary 
------- 
¶1.  On April 21, 2006, World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz 
named Salvadoran Juan Jose Daboub as a Managing Director of 
the World Bank.  Daboub was one of ex-President Flores' most 
trusted advisors, and he served as Chief of Staff and 
Minister of Finance during Flores' term from 1999-2004.  He 
is known as a loyal defender of the Washington Consensus, 
and in El Salvador he promoted privatization, free markets, 
and dollarization.  Daboub studied industrial engineering at 
North Carolina State and has extensive private sector 
experience.  End Summary. 
 
U.S. Educated Engineer 
---------------------- 
¶2.  Daboub is a graduate of the high school Liceo 
Salvadoreno in San Salvador.  In 1985 he received a Bachelor 
of Science in Industrial Engineering, in 1987 a Master of 
Science in Industrial Engineering, and in 1989 a Doctorate 
in Industrial Engineering--all from NC State.  While at NC 
State, he was a Research Engineer from 1984 to 1989 and a 
Teaching Assistant from 1985 to 1989. 
 
Manufacturing and Privatization Guru 
------------------------------------ 
¶3.  After completing his studies, Daboub returned to El 
Salvador and became Vice-President of INCOMES/CISMAN 
(International Consultants in Manufacturing and Engineering 
Systems), a position he held from 1989 to 1995.  Daboub and 
his family founded several businesses over the past several 
decades, including Productos Dioro (a bakery), Emplaza 
(plastic packaging), Distribuidora Santa Elena (food 
distributor) and DABCO (retail candy stores); he has held 
numerous management positions at those firms.  As a 
consultant on manufacturing practices and processes, he has 
provided advisory services to numerous U.S. and Salvadoran 
companies. 
 
¶4.  From 1992 to 1996 Daboub simultaneously served on the 
boards of directors of several state-owned electricity 
generation and distribution companies, and he used those 
positions to push forward privatization of the electricity 
sector in El Salvador.  Privatization of the electricity 
sector earned the government $1.12 billion in proceeds from 
asset sales, and electricity prices are now among the lowest 
in the region.  Daboub was also a proponent of 
telecommunications privatizations, serving as President of 
the state-owned ANTEL from 1996 to 1998 and President of 
INTEL, an ANTEL spin-off, in 1998.  He also was President of 
telecommunications firm Estrategas from 1998 to 1999.  As a 
consultant, he provided advisory services to CTE-France 
Telecom in El Salvador during its takeover of state-owned 
ANTEL. 
 
Super Minister Daboub 
---------------------- 
¶5.  From 1999 to 2004, Daboub was one of President Flores' 
most trusted advisors, and was popularly called the "Super 
Minister" due to his extensive influence, particularly on 
government modernization, economic policy and the budgeting. 
Flores named Daboub Chief of Staff when he took office, but 
in May 2001 he became Finance Minister--while retaining his 
former duties as Chief of Staff.  He is known as a loyal 
defender of the Washington Consensus, and in El Salvador he 
promoted privatization, free markets, and dollarization. 
When Flores finished his term, Daboub became Executive 
Director of the America Libre Institute (ILA) in Washington, 
an effort headed by ex-President Flores. 
 
Personal 
-------- 
¶6.  (SBU) Daboub was born in San Salvador on July 4, 1963. 
He is married to MIT-educated Glorybel Silhy de Daboub. 
They have two children, a boy Juan Jose and one girl Sofia 
Maria, and are expecting a third.  Embassy officers 
characterize Daboub as friendly and approachable, but 
serious about his work.  He is known as a careful decision- 
maker who takes into account the political context in which 
he operates. 
 
Please visit San Salvador's Classified Website at 
http://www.state.sgov/p/wha/sansalvador/index .cfm. 
 
Barclay