Viewing cable 06WELLINGTON67
Title: NEW ZEALAND SUPPORTS MOST U.S. GOALS FOR UN REFORM

IdentifierCreatedReleasedClassificationOrigin
06WELLINGTON672006-01-26 01:51:00 2011-08-30 01:44:00 CONFIDENTIAL Embassy Wellington
This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.
C O N F I D E N T I A L WELLINGTON 000067 
 
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STATE FOR IO/UNP, EAP/ANP-DRICCI 
 
E.O. 12958: DECL: 01/25/2016 
TAGS: PREL ADCO PHUM KUNR NZ UNGA
SUBJECT: NEW ZEALAND SUPPORTS MOST U.S. GOALS FOR UN REFORM 
 
REF: A. (A) SECSTATE 4746 
     ¶B. (B) SECSTATE 4745 
 
(U) Classified by: Charge d'Affaires David R. Burnett. 
Reasons: 1.4 (b) and (d). 
 
¶1. (SBU) New Zealand concurs with most U.S. objectives for UN 
reform.  Charge delivered refs A and B on January 25 to 
Caroline Forsyth, deputy secretary of the New Zealand 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.  Forsyth said that 
reforming UN management was a key priority for New Zealand, 
that all UN mandates should be reviewed, and that the new 
Human Rights Council should have the ability to consider 
country-specific resolutions.  But New Zealand does not want 
to specify that a two-thirds vote be required to pass such 
resolutions, and it does not support automatic P-5 membership 
on the council. 
 
Management reform 
----------------- 
¶2. (C) Forsyth said giving the Secretariat the authority to 
shift staff positions and to redeploy resources to meet the 
UN's goals is in line with how New Zealand manages its public 
services.  New Zealand was pleased to contribute to the 
compromise that set both a spending cap and a deadline for 
implementing the management reforms.  Forsyth saw the 
extended deadline as providing time to encourage the 
Secretariat to sort out personnel and budget regulations and 
 
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achieve compromises on reforms.  But she predicted that the 
G-77 would hamper progress on the reforms. 
 
¶3. (SBU) All UN General Assembly mandates should be reviewed, 
Forsyth said.  While the issue needed to be handled 
sensitively, she added, the "deadwood" needed to be cleared 
away.  Forsyth pointed out that some member states portray 
management reform and mandate review as attacks on the UN. 
She also noted the U.S. need for these reforms to be 
implemented to ensure Congressional support for the 
organization. 
 
Human Rights Council 
-------------------- 
¶4. (SBU) Forsyth cited progress on forming a Human Rights 
Council, but expected its creation would entail difficult 
tradeoffs.  New Zealand prefers a smaller council.  Forsyth 
said her government did not support the automatic inclusion 
of the Security Council's permanent members on the Human 
Rights Council, which, if the council were smaller, would 
"crowd out the rest of us."  The Charge said that a smaller 
group would improve efficiency.  He added that, while the 
United States is not seeking guarantees that it or other P-5 
members be elected to the council, it wants members to have 
strong human-rights records.  Forsyth said consensus had not 
yet formed, even among like-minded countries, on whether a 
two-thirds "supermajority" should be required to elect 
council members, and she warned that such a requirement could 
be a "two-edged sword" by not letting some members in. 
 
¶5. (SBU) Forsyth said New Zealand wants the council to be 
able to address country-specific situations.  But it opposes 
requiring a two-thirds majority for the passage of 
country-specific resolutions and instead would leave the 
issue to the council to resolve.  The Charge expressed 
concern that if the council set its own rules for voting, the 
bar might be placed so high that no country could be taken to 
task for human rights abuses. 
 
Other issues 
------------ 
¶6. (C) New Zealand was disappointed that the Outcome Document 
did not include nonproliferation and disarmament goals, but 
it remained committed to building on the World Summit and 
improving the UN's operations, Forsyth said.  Like the United 
States, New Zealand was pleased with the effort to establish 
a Peacebuilding Commission.  While continuing to oppose the 
veto in the Security Council, New Zealand supports Japan's 
membership in an expanded council.  But Forsyth did not 
expect council reform to occur anytime soon, and she 
predicted that the process of selecting a new 
Secretary-General would "not encourage boldness." 
 
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Burnett