Viewing cable 07JAKARTA1005
Title: CT TRAINING PROGRAM PROMOTES COOPERATION IN

IdentifierCreatedReleasedClassificationOrigin
07JAKARTA10052007-04-10 06:35:00 2011-08-30 01:44:00 CONFIDENTIAL Embassy Jakarta
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PP RUEHCHI RUEHDT RUEHHM
DE RUEHJA #1005/01 1000635
ZNY CCCCC ZZH
P 100635Z APR 07
FM AMEMBASSY JAKARTA
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 4247
INFO RUEHZS/ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN NATIONS PRIORITY
RUEHBY/AMEMBASSY CANBERRA PRIORITY 0634
RUEHWL/AMEMBASSY WELLINGTON PRIORITY 1448
RUEATRS/DEPT OF TREASURY WASHDC PRIORITY
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C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 03 JAKARTA 001005 
 
SIPDIS 
 
SIPDIS 
 
DEPT FOR S/CT, EAP/MTS, INL FOR BOULDIN 
DOJ FOR CTS THORNTON, AAG SWARTZ, OPDAT FOR 
LEHMANN/ALEXANDRE 
FBI FOR ETTUI/SSA ROTH 
 
E.O. 12958: DECL: 04/10/2017 
TAGS: PTER PGOV KJUS ASEC CASC ID
SUBJECT: CT TRAINING PROGRAM PROMOTES COOPERATION IN 
CENTRAL, EAST JAVA 
 
REF: A. 06 JAKARTA 12159 
 
     ¶B. JAKARTA 827 
     ¶C. 06 JAKARTA 13454 
     ¶D. 05 JAKARTA 16574 
     ¶E. JAKARTA 826 
 
Classified By: Political Officer Adam West for reasons 1.4(b) and (d). 
 
Summary 
--------- 
 
¶1. (C) On April 2-4, Post co-sponsored the latest in a series 
of CT training workshops, this time at the Jakarta Centre for 
Law Enforcement Cooperation (JCLEC) in Semarang, Central 
Java.  Other sponsors included the Embassies of Canada and 
New Zealand, with the French Embassy providing a French CT 
expert to address the group.  Course participants included 
police, prosecutors and judges drawn primarily from the 
provinces of East and Central Java, a region considered key 
to the GOI's CT effort.  Speakers included representatives 
from the CT Desk in the Coordinating Ministry of Political, 
Legal and Security Affairs, the Attorney General's Task Force 
on Terrorism and Transnational Crime (AGO TF), the French 
Ministry of Justice, the Indonesian National Police Criminal 
Investigation Directorate and the Supreme Court.  Speakers 
discussed the roots of Indonesian terrorism, took a critical 
look at the limitations of Indonesian CT law and explored 
ways to improve coordination among the different agencies 
involved in the CT effort.  Post funding for the event came 
from a $750,000 FY04 ESF grant which supported the creation 
of the AGO TF.  The grant will also be used to fund the first 
of two groups of AGO TF prosecutors who will travel to the US 
on a comparative study tour from April 24 through May 5.  End 
summary 
 
Targeting a Key Region 
----------------------- 
 
¶2. (C) On April 2-4, Post teamed up with the Embassies of 
Canada, New Zealand and France to co-sponsor a CT training 
workshop held at the Jakarta Centre for Law Enforcement 
Cooperation (JCLEC) in Semarang, Central Java.  The program 
was the latest in a series of CT-focused workshops held 
throughout Indonesia and was designed around three main 
goals: improving practitioners' knowledge of Indonesia's CT 
law and how it can be applied; showcasing advanced techniques 
for investigating and prosecuting terrorism cases; and 
improving cooperation between police, prosecutors and judges 
in the fight against terrorism (ref A).  The program brought 
together 34 police, prosecutors and judges from the provinces 
of East and Central Java, a region which has yielded 10 
convicted terrorists over the past year and which is the 
scene of an ongoing manhunt for leading fugitives Noordin Top 
and Abu Dujana.  The recent arrests in Central Java 
illustrate the ongoing importance of this region for 
Indonesia's CT efforts (ref B).  The participants appeared 
highly engaged throughout the workshop, and many reported 
being pleased with the quality of the speakers and the 
program as a whole.  Post funding for the event came from a 
$750,000 FY04 ESF grant which supported the creation of the 
AGO TF (ref C). 
 
Roots of JI and Lessons from Abroad 
------------------------------------ 
 
¶3. (C) Brigadier General (ret.) Ansyaad Mbai, head of the 
GOI's CT Desk, opened the workshop on April 2.  Mbai stressed 
the need to combine "soft" and "hard" power to defeat 
terrorism and emphasized the Indonesian roots of Jemaah 
Islamiyah (JI) and other radical groups, which he described 
as inspired by the Negara Islam Indonesia (NII) movement of 
the 1950's.  He also discussed how weaknesses in Indonesia's 
legal framework complicated the pursuit and prosecution of 
terrorists and, using France as an example, cited specific 
ways in which Indonesian law could be strengthened.  These 
"Lessons from France" included the need for longer detention 
periods and for judges to play a role in investigations, and 
the need to separate terrorists while in detention.  Mbai 
also praised French conspiracy statutes that allowed suspects 
 
JAKARTA 00001005  002 OF 003 
 
 
who planned attacks, received military training or surveyed 
targets to be tried as terrorists regardless of whether or 
not the attacks were carried out.  (Note: Mbai's knowledge of 
the French legal system is largely a result of his 
participation in a USG-funded study tour to Paris in 2005 - 
ref D.)  He also lamented the slow pace of Indonesia's 
Parliament in revising legislation. 
 
¶4. (C) Supreme Court Justice Djoko Sarwoko and Judge Roki 
Panjaitan, also veterans of the 2005 Paris program, discussed 
more specifically how anti-terrorism laws are applied in 
Indonesia and in other countries such as Malaysia, France and 
Australia.  Sarwoko explained the need to vigorously pursue 
terrorists while at the same time protecting the civil rights 
of the accused.  Panjaitan described the international nature 
of terrorist networks and demonstrated that terrorism in 
Indonesia began long before the attacks of September 11, 
¶2001.  He stressed that prosecutors in terrorism cases need 
to find evidence which connects the suspect to these larger 
networks and not simply to the immediate circumstances 
surrounding the arrest.  He also stressed the need for close 
cooperation between all three areas of law enforcement. 
 
¶5. (C) French Interior Liaison Hubert Ancelin and Virginie 
Brelurut, Head of the Organized Crime and Terrorism Bureau at 
the French Ministry of Justice, explained that CT 
investigations and prosecutions in France were all tracked by 
a central coordinating agency and that police were required 
to report their investigative activities to prosecutors or 
investigative judges at each stage of the investigation, 
allowing for far greater coordination between the two groups. 
 Brelurut described a number of salient characteristics of 
the French legal system with regard to CT, including 
expansive conspiracy laws which provided prison terms of up 
to 30 years for suspects convicted of planning to carry out 
crimes, including terrorism.  She also described the 
importance of constantly updating the CT laws to adapt to 
changing circumstances.  She cited as one of the primary 
tasks of the Organized Crime and Terrorism Bureau the 
proposing of updates to the law, which, according to 
Brelurut, had been revised some 10 times over the past 20 
years.  Brelurut's presentation generated intense interest 
from the participants and a lengthy question and answer 
period. 
 
Improving Indonesian Practice 
------------------------------ 
 
¶6. (C) Presentations by prosecutors Payaman and Asep Maryono 
from the Attorney General's Task Force on Terrorism and 
Transnational Crime (AGO TF) related their experiences as 
lead prosecutors in the recent convictions of three 
terrorists involved in the 2005 schoolgirl beheadings in 
Poso, Central Sulawesi (ref E.)  They emphasized the 
importance of elucidating the motive for the attack in court 
and the need for cooperation with police investigators.  They 
also discussed the importance of meeting with witnesses prior 
to their giving testimony.  (Note: witness preparation is not 
a standard practice in Indonesia at this time.) 
 
¶7. (C) The final presentation was led by Police Inspector 
General Gories Mere and Brig. Gen. Surya Dharma.  The two men 
arrived by helicopter from Yogyakarta, Central Java, where 
they were directly overseeing the operation that led to the 
arrest of eight JI-linked terrorists over the past 10 days 
(ref B).  They described the results of those raids in 
detail, as well as the history of JI and its regional 
structure.  (Note: According to press reports, seven of the 
eight suspects have already been transferred to Jakarta for 
trial, and Payaman and Maryono told us they expect to be part 
of the AGO TF team that will handle the prosecutions.) 
 
¶8. (C) For the final session, the participants broke into 
small groups to discuss ways in which CT investigations and 
prosecutions could be improved in Indonesia.  One issue 
mentioned by all three groups was the security of those who 
must be present in the courtroom, including witnesses, police 
investigators, prosecutors and judges.  Participants 
generally agreed that witnesses were highly vulnerable to 
 
JAKARTA 00001005  003 OF 003 
 
 
intimidation and were often unwilling to testify for that 
reason.  (Note: Post Resident Legal Advisor (RLA/OPDAT) plans 
to conduct a training program to address this issue 
specifically.)  Moreover, police who testified also risked 
blowing their covers, and judges and prosecutors had been 
targets of retaliatory attacks.  Participants suggested that 
judges try to keep photographers out of the courtroom to 
protect the identities of those involved, and to consider the 
use of closed sessions in order to take the testimony of 
certain witnesses.  Another issue which came up was the lack 
of clarity on the use of intelligence reporting as evidence 
in the courtroom.  This brought up the larger issue of 
limitations on the use of evidence in criminal trials, which, 
discussants agreed, needed to be addressed through reform of 
the criminal procedure code.  (Note: RLA/OPDAT is providing 
assistance to the GOI drafting team currently working on 
revising the code.)  Judges also cited as problematic the 
rules on detention of suspects, which allow a maximum of six 
months pre-trial detention and 150 days for the trial.  The 
strict time limits pose a significant limitation in complex 
cases which require the testimony of a large number of 
witnesses. 
 
Prosecutors Coming to the US 
----------------------------- 
 
¶9. (SBU) Post's next project involving the AGO TF is a 
comparative study tour to the US scheduled for April 24 - May 
¶5.  The tour will bring 11 prosecutors to Sacramento, 
Washington DC and Chicago, where they will meet with law 
enforcement and judicial officials and witness court 
proceedings at the federal, state and local levels.  In 
Washington the group will meet with representatives from the 
DOJ offices responsible for terrorism, money laundering and 
IPR, and with relevant DOS officials.  A second tour for the 
remaining AGO TF prosecutors is tentatively scheduled for 
later this year. 
HEFFERN