Viewing cable 07JAKARTA1816
Title: AMBASSADOR HUME'S COURTESY CALL ON FM WIRAJUDA

IdentifierCreatedReleasedClassificationOrigin
07JAKARTA18162007-07-03 10:17:00 2011-08-30 01:44:00 CONFIDENTIAL Embassy Jakarta
VZCZCXYZ0000
OO RUEHWEB

DE RUEHJA #1816/01 1841017
ZNY CCCCC ZZH
O 031017Z JUL 07
FM AMEMBASSY JAKARTA
TO SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 5296
C O N F I D E N T I A L JAKARTA 001816 
 
SIPDIS 
 
SIPDIS 
 
DEPARTMENT FOR EAP, EAP/MTS 
 
E.O. 12958: DECL: 07/03/2017 
TAGS: PREL PGOV ID
SUBJECT: AMBASSADOR HUME'S COURTESY CALL ON FM WIRAJUDA 
 
 
Classified By: Ambassador Cameron R. Hume, for reason 1.4 (b,d). 
 
¶1. (C) SUMMARY:  In a July 3 courtesy call on Indonesian 
Foreign Minister Wirajuda as part of the process of 
presenting ambassadorial credentials, Ambassador Hume 
highlighted common interests of the two countries, pledged to 
strengthen the bilateral relationship and commended Indonesia 
for its progress since 1998 and its religious toleration. 
Wirajuda welcomed Ambassador Hume's arrival after a 
considerable hiatus following Ambassador Pascoe's departure, 
said the U.S.-Indonesia relationship was important, 
underscored Indonesia's established tradition of moderate 
Islam and expressed appreciation for U.S. assistance, 
particularly in combating terrorism.  Ambassador's formal 
presentation of credentials to President Yudhoyono has yet to 
be scheduled.  End summary. 
 
¶2. (C) FM Wirajuda welcomed Ambassador Hume, said the 
Indonesian government looked forward to working with the 
Embassy under his direction and underscored the importance of 
the bilateral relationship.  Ambassador echoed Wirajuda's 
sentiments and pledged to work to strengthen that 
relationship.  President Bush and President Yudhoyono had a 
strong relationship, he said.  The United States and 
Indonesia shared many common concerns, including justice, 
democracy, the welfare of their peoples, the rule of law, 
security and international cooperation.  There would be ample 
opportunity to cooperate in these and other areas. 
 
¶3. (C) Wirajuda related the importance of the building in 
which they were meeting.  It was called the Pancasila 
building because it was the place where the early republic's 
founders had deliberated on the country's state philosophy, 
which had became known as Pancasila (Five Principles).  The 
building had also been the site of deliberations after World 
War II on the republic's first constitution.  These 
deliberations had included the question of whether Indonesia 
should become an Islamic republic.  Despite the fact that the 
vast majority of the population was Muslim, the majority of 
the people had favored a secular state.  Indonesia had chosen 
the middle ground:  there was no official state religion, but 
the government was assigned a role in promoting religious 
life.  Accordingly, the Department of Religion had a division 
for each major religion represented in Indonesian society. 
 
¶4. (C) In the decades that followed, Wirajuda noted, some 
Indonesians had still clung to the notion of an Islamic state 
and the rule of sharia law, and periodically some had 
endorsed violence to achieve those ends.  In a sense, Jemaah 
Islamiyah terrorists were a continuation of that tendency, 
despite their broader regional presence.  The overwhelming 
majority of Indonesian Muslims had remained moderate, and 
terrorism was not gaining ground.  Indonesia appreciated the 
assistance that the United States and other partners had 
provided to Indonesia in combating terrorism.  The success of 
these collective efforts, however, ultimately depended not 
only on capturing and prosecuting the terrorists, but also on 
strengthening moderate Islamic forces.  After September 11 
the moderates had grown quiet, but recently they had begun to 
find their voice again, and Indonesia had sponsored a number 
of conferences and interfaith dialogues in an effort to 
bridge differences within Islam as well as between Islam and 
other religions.  Indonesia had also just finished hosting a 
major conference on police counterterrorism training. 
Indonesia was becoming more open-minded, both at home and 
toward its international partners. 
 
¶5. (C) Ambassador Hume pointed out that all U.S. money bore 
the words "In God We Trust" and that founding documents of 
the United States often spoke of "one nation under God," yet 
in none of these references did we ever say who God was. 
Religion served an important function in many societies as an 
organizing principle for understanding the world around us. 
Ambassador related that he had spent most of his time 
overseas since 1968 in Islamic countries and had witnessed 
the religious fervor of many Muslims.  Fervor was not a 
threat, but violence was unacceptable as a means of advancing 
religious ends.  Washington appreciated the strides Indonesia 
had made since 1998 on democracy, rule of law, 
counterterrorism and security, and Indonesia should explain 
this progress to the two Congressional delegations (Payne and 
Faleomaveaga) that were in town this week.  Indonesia had a 
good story to tell and should tell it, he stressed. 
 
¶6. (U) Ambassador will present his credentials to President 
Yudhoyono through a formal ceremony which has not yet been 
scheduled. 
 
¶7. (C) COMMENT:  President Bush has announced plans to 
appoint a U.S. ambassador to the Organization of the Islamic 
Conference (OIC).  Given Indonesia's importance as the 
world's largest Muslim democracy and the example Indonesia 
can set as a beacon of moderate Islam within the Islamic 
world, we believe the first stop of the future U.S. envoy to 
the Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC) should be 
Jakarta. 
HUME