Viewing cable 09USOSCE284
Title: OSCE/FSC: DECEMBER 2009 - END OF FALL SESSION AND

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09USOSCE2842009-12-18 14:56:00 2011-08-30 01:44:00 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Mission USOSCE
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UNCLAS USOSCE 000284 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
 
C O R R E C T E D COPY TEXT PARA 8 
 
STATE FOR VCI/CCA, VCI/NRRC, EUR/RPM, EUR/PRA, EUR/CARC, 
SCA/CEN, SCA/RA, PM/WRA, ISN/CPI 
NSC FOR SHERWOOD-RANDALL, HAYDEN, MCFAUL, HOVENIER, 
NILSSON, FRIEDT 
OSD FOR ISA (WALLENDER, KEHL) 
JCS, EUCOM, USAREUR AND CENTCOM: FOR J-5 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: KCFE OSCE PARM PREL RS XG
SUBJECT: OSCE/FSC: DECEMBER 2009 - END OF FALL SESSION AND 
AEMI 
 
REF: A. STATE 93327 
     ¶B. DTG 082106Z SEP 09 
¶1. (SBU) Summary:  This message constitutes an end of fall 
2009 session report on the OSCE's Forum for Security 
Cooperation (FSC).  The last FSC plenary on December 16 
denoted not only the end of the United Kingdom's FSC 
Chairmanship but also a review of the FSC's accomplishments 
and prospects in 2010 under Greece's FSC Chairmanship. 
Russian priorities and expectations for the 2010 FSC are also 
noted.  We fully expect our efforts in 2010 to continue 
looking for ways to manage Russia's promotion of 
legally-binding European Security initiatives in the OSCE, 
with particular emphasis on "ways in which to strengthen the 
OSCE's politico-military toolbox."  Russia's unrelenting 
attention to the Vienna Document, and now the Code of Conduct 
on Politico-Military Aspects of Security, is gaining momentum 
among delegates.  We will actively continue to explore ways 
to facilitate Russia's positive contributions to the FSC.  A 
summary on the Vienna Document 1999, Annual Exchange of 
Military Information is also provided below.  We note that 
the Russian Federation and Tajikistan notified delays in 
their respective AEMI submissions.  Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, 
and Turkmenistan provided no VD99 data.  End Summary. 
 
The Final Plenary of 2009 
 
¶2. (SBU) At the December 16 FSC plenary, Russia (Ulyanov 
under Agenda Item I, General Statements) made an affable 
intervention calling the autumn session "fruitful and 
satisfying," singling out decisions on Small Arms and Light 
Weapons (SALW), non-proliferation and the Athens Ministerial 
Decision on Issues Relevant to the FSC.  Russia went further, 
praising the UK Chair as "the most effective and fair" since 
France's Chairmanship in 1999!  Ulyanov said he was now 
"hopeful" that the FSC after the Athens Ministerial Decisions 
was now primed to overcome the "protracted deadlock" that had 
until recently characterized the forum, thus allowing the FSC 
to "reacquire its status as the key European forum for 
discussion of hard security issues." 
 
¶3. (SBU) Ulyanov listed Russia's priorities for 2010: 1) 
special sessions of the FSC emphasizing arms control issues 
within the framework of "current security conditions"; 2) a 
more informal, free exchange of opinions and arguments on the 
principles that manage inter-state relations with emphasis on 
the Code of Conduct; 3) an inventory of the OSCE's 
political-military toolbox including "first and foremost 
VD99"; and 4) attention to improve the procedures and 
mechanisms for settling conflict as was initially envisioned 
in the early 1990s but since disappeared from the FSC's 
"field of vision."  Ulyanov concluded there was an enormous 
volume of work for the FSC in 2010, pledging Russia's close 
cooperation. 
 
¶4. (SBU) Ukraine underscored its commitment to strengthen the 
OSCE's contribution to address WMD proliferation issues in 
2010, following up on the just adopted Athens Ministerial 
Declaration on Non-proliferation.  Ukraine specifically 
suggested the FSC consider a revision of the OSCE's 
Principles Governing Non-Proliferation Principles 
(DOC.FSC/6/96) as adopted at the FSC Plenary in Budapest 
¶1994. 
 
FSC Security Dialogue Autumn Wrap-up 
 
¶5. (SBU) The Security Dialogue throughout the autumn session 
as chaired by the UK was dynamic.  Besides sober briefings 
from (D/SACEUR) General McColl and (D/ISAF) General Dutton on 
Afghanistan, the FSC engaged in discussions on Gender Issues 
related to Small Arms and Light Weapons (SALW), Cluster 
 
Munitions, and Non-Proliferation Issues, including 1540 
coordination.  There was intense discussion throughout the 
session on both Georgia-Russia issues stemming from the 
Tagliavini Report and on Russia's attempt to press forward a 
wholesale review of Vienna Document 1999.  In contrast to 
Ulyanov's gracious remarks noted above, throughout the Fall 
Session Russia expressed clear disappointment in the FSC 
Security Dialogue as generally irrelevant with the sole 
exception of the occasional vitriolic exchanges between 
Russia and Georgia.  Russia throughout the fall session also 
intermittently accused "some participating States" of 
deferring to other forums and venues any pertinent security 
discussions. 
 
¶6. (SBU) At the opening of the UK Chairmanship in September, 
UK Security Policy Director Paul Johnston placed emphasis on 
further development of the FSC's Small Arms and Light Weapons 
(SALW) agenda.  The FSC Decision 11/09 (Expert Advice on 
Implementation of Section V of the OSCE Document on SALW) and 
Ministerial Decision 15/09 (tasking the development of a Plan 
of Action among other activities) were solid accomplishments. 
 The incoming Greek Chair already flagged for USDEL as early 
priorities development of an SALW Plan of Action and 
preparations for the Fourth Biennial Meeting of States on 
combating the illicit trade in SALW.  Greece plans to 
circulate a "Food-for-Thought" paper on SALW before the end 
of the year. 
 
¶7. (SBU) Non-proliferation assumed a larger role in the FSC's 
fall session, mainly due to UK and U.S. attention to UNSCR 
1540 and related issues, including the initial contribution 
for a Best Practice Guide (BPG) on 1540 implementation (i.e., 
the U.S.-drafted chapter on Export Control and Transshipment) 
and efforts to establish an extra-budgetary position for a 
dedicated 1540 action officer within the International 
Secretariat.  These efforts are ongoing and will require the 
U.S. and UK to continue not only close collaboration but also 
leadership.  Nonetheless, though the Ukraine-sponsored OSCE 
Athens Ministerial Declaration on Non-Proliferation was both 
remarkable and organizationally a positive political 
statement, the core of the OSCE's role on Non-Proliferation 
is evolving and may require some heavy lifting in 2010 to 
keep it prominent on the agenda and appropriately balanced 
with efforts in the Security Committee in 2010. 
 
The FSC yet to come 
 
¶8. (SBU) In informal USDEL consultations with the incoming 
Greek FSC Chairmanship, Greece was frank about the limited 
capacity Athens brings to the non-proliferation agenda and 
also its reliance on the U.S. to take the lead in this area; 
we noted our interests to keep non-proliferation a prominent 
part of the FSC's agenda.  Greece expressed willingness to 
provide political support as necessary.  Nonetheless, we 
raised with Greece the importance of maintaining momentum 
both on developing additional chapters for the UNSCR 1540 BPG 
and the Security Dialogue on non-proliferation-related 
issues.  Finding ways to build more inter-institutional 
interaction, such as invitations to IAEA and OPCW to brief 
the FSC, is under consideration but we note it may not get 
fully socialized prior to Hungary's turn as FSC Chair 
following Greece. 
 
¶9. (SBU) Greece asked if the U.S. would be willing to discuss 
developments related to START-follow on negotiations and 
Missile Defense within the framework of the Security 
Dialogue.  We noted that Missile Defense was an issue that 
had direct relevance to OSCE participating States and could 
bring in interesting points of view, especially if Russia 
were willing to make a contribution.  On the other hand USDEL 
noted it could not commit to either request and it may be 
 
premature to raise START in the OSCE unless it was in a 
broader context, such as discussions related to the NPT 
Review Conference.  Nonetheless, we assured Greece that we 
would report its interests on these topics for consideration 
by Washington authorities. 
 
¶10. (SBU) Greece plans to build on the UK's accomplishments 
as set forth in the Athens Ministerial Decision 16/09, Issues 
Relevant to the FSC.  In a nuanced shift away from singling 
out Vienna Document 1999 for more in depth attention, Greece 
noted that the OSCE Code of Conduct on Politico-Military 
Aspects of Security was better aligned to the 
cross-dimensional aspects of European Security within the 
Corfu Process.  Greece intends to make harmonization of the 
FSC's work and the Corfu Process a priority, acknowledging 
the Russian proposal for a European Security Treaty as a 
divisive maneuver and a challenge to the integrity of current 
institutions and security regimes. 
 
Annual Exchange of Military Information 
 
¶11. (SBU) The December 15 AEMI will be remembered because 
Russia (and Tajikistan) failed to provide their respective 
VD99 data, citing delays for "technical reasons."  Russia 
(Ulyanov) pointedly informed the U.S. (Neighbour) to reassure 
there were no political motivations behind the omission. 
(Note:  Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenistan provided no 
VD99 data, and Russia also failed to provide its 
"CFE-one-pager" for the first time in two years.  End note.) 
Russia hoped it would submit its data at the latest by early 
part of the week of December 21.  The U.S. submitted its VD99 
data under cover of diplomatic note (Number 2009/061, filed 
as FSC.EMI/426/09) for the AEMI on December 15.  The U.S. 
Defense Planning data was submitted under diplomatic note 
number 2009/060, filed as FSC.EMI/425/09.  The U.S. 
submission of the Conventional Arms Transfer data (per State 
127974; DTG 151445Z DEC 09) was conveyed by diplomatic note 
number 2009/062 filed as FSC.EMI/442/09. 
 
¶12. (SBU) Comment: The 2010 FSC will need to find a way to 
manage balancing priorities between the whole of the 
political-military toolbox (important for developing 
deliverables for the Corfu Process).  By our count that 
includes strengthening current arms control and CSBM 
instruments (i.e., Code of Conduct, SALW, and 
Non-proliferation will garner more attention), and the 
still-open issue of what to "do" with VD99.  It will also 
continue to be a challenge to maintain balance among the new 
and emerging asymmetric or cross-dimensional security issues 
like cyber-security and conflict prevention and crisis 
management.  Russia will press in the FSC for a discussion on 
the conflict cycle from early warning to rehabilitation. 
 
¶13. (SBU) (comment cont.) We also note that there are VD99 
proposals still to be addressed in 2010, including: 
 
1) Ukraine's Food-for-Thought on Interpretations of Some 
Provisions of the Vienna Document 1999 Chapter I, "Annual 
Exchange of Military Information" (FSC.DEL/196/09), which 
would cover deployed or non-resident combat units separated 
from their primary location.  (NOTE: Ukraine acknowledged to 
USDEL their intention was to capture Russia's excess 
equipment, including aircraft, reported in last year's data 
as located in Ukraine, subordinated to Black Sea Fleet Units, 
but actually located on Russian territory.  According to 
Ukraine Military Advisor Colonel Alex Taran, Ukraine accepted 
as valid Russia's declaration of 18 ACVs, six pieces of 
artillery, and two combat aircraft in excess of Black Sea 
Fleet limits. END NOTE.); 
 
2) Turkey's proposal for use of digital cameras for to 
 
 
improve compliance and verification under Chapter IX of VD99 
(FSC.DEL/124/09/Rev.1); and 
3) The reemergence of Denmark's proposal for a VD99-plus (the 
slightly-edited original version from June 16 was freshly 
circulated among NATO-T members on December 10). 
 
¶14. (SBU) These outstanding VD99 related issues in light of 
the Ministerial Decision 16/09 attention to "strengthening" 
the document, suggests that effective and timely coordination 
among Allies is imperative if the FSC hopes to manage the 
Russian European Security Treaty initiative within the proper 
comprehensive framework.  As the UK Chair (Gare) noted in 
final remarks at this last plenary of 2009, the prospects for 
the FSC's workload in 2010 is "frightening."  End Comment. 
 
¶15. (SBU) List of USDEL Reporting on Fall 2009 FSC issues: A) 
USOSCE 00198, DTG 100921Z SEP 09; B) USOSCE 00201, DTG 
111531Z SEP 09; C) USOSCE 00205, DTG 220627Z SEP 09; D) 
USOSCE 00212, DTG 291123Z SEP 09; E) USOSCE 214, DTG 021133Z 
OCT 09; F) USOSCE 221, DTG 1506382 OCT 09; G) USOSCE 00224, 
161347Z OCT 09; H) USOSCE 00235, DTG 221414Z OCT 09; I) 
USOSCE 00239, DTG 231306Z OCT 09; J) USOSCE 00245, DTG 
301326Z OCT 09; K) USOSCE 251, DTG 101617Z NOV 09; L) USOSCE 
00256 DTG 161644Z NOV 09; M) USOSCE 00260, DTG 201048Z NOV 
09; N) USOSCE 00269, DTG 271005Z NOV 09; O) USOSCE 00274, DTG 
110809Z DEC 09. 
FULLER